Some Winnipeg Jets interviews translated

Bruce Fedyck-USA TODAY Sports

Ondrej Pavelec and Ivan Telegin have both recently been interviewed in their native language. We do a rough translation with the help of some second language friends of the blog and a bit of Google translate.

Ondrej Pavelec was recently interviewed by slovacky.denik.cz on his season with the Jets, his kids hockey camp, and his hometown.

We've extracted a few questions and answers from the interview which have been translated by friend of the blog and Czech extraordinaire Dede Stinglová. Everyone say thank you!

At the end of your NHL season, you weren't playing goal for the Jets, with whom you have a long contract with. There are some rumours in media that they'd like to pay you out of the contract. Do you know where will you play the next season?

We didn't make the playoffs this season. We ruined it by ourselves and because we weren't close to the playoffs and even if we made it, we wouldn't deserve it. Journalist actually asked us if there's anyway they will buy me out of the contract but the GM said that he count on me as the number one goalie for the next season. I've got three more years on my contract with the Jets, that's for sure. However, you can never be sure about the things on the other side of the sea. There could be trade or the redemption of the contract. I don't want to think about it now. The thing I am 100% sure about is, that I've got a contract for three more years in Winnipeg.

Winnipeg might be the coldest city, in case of the weather there. You can't think about sunbathing, like in Atlanta, right? How can you describe living in Canada?

You're right, it's really the true north, which is cold and particularly in Winnipeg, where the winter is strong and long but it's a smaller city and people love hockey there; you know the ticket are sold out for many seasons ahead. Anyway, it's not Florida or California. I haven't got much time to go out during the season. When's the day off, the nice weather would be surely better but I am there because of hockey.

So you think the -40°C weather could replace "hot" hearts of Canadians?

Well you can't think like this. Of course, no one likes minus forty degrees, and this year we had also about minus fifty degrees. That's a really, really cold winter and you have to be still somewhere inside. It's surely worse for families with children, parent's can go out with them. But we can't change it.

You can find the article in whole here.

--------

Ivan Telegin did an interview recently with the official KHL website.

The article has been translated with the help of a FotB member who preferred just to help than receive credit. You know who you are though (and thank you). Here are the excerpts that have to do with the Jets:

You were not cleared to play after arriving at CSKA last year. As a result you missed an entire season, which is dangerous for a young player. What happened?

After returning from across the ocean, I tried to get a contract from Locomotive and Mellurg but failed. I had my rights moved, but still could not play. My problems with the Winnipeg Jets had not yet been resolved, and could not go on to the ice due to my NHL suspension. In the winter time my suspension was lifted, but by then I was out of shape and re-aggravated an old injury, so I decided that the best approach would be to prepare to be in perfect shape for next season. Everything is fine now, I work on my own and pay the costs.

You are not the first player to leave the NHL after a disagreement with the club's decisions. There are examples even of Swedish and Finish hockey players, but no suspension. Why did Winnipeg suspend you?

This is a very long and unpleasant story, but probably worth telling so not to leave questions. I have to say that Winnipeg was right in suspending me. No question: I had a valid contract with them. I was demoted to the farm team but I refused to go.
It wasn't that I was ready for the NHL but they demoted me. No, it wasn't like that. In the season before last, I was seriously injured; after a collision I had a concussion so, so strong that the side-effects only stopped recently. For eight months I could not play or exercise. Two weeks after the injury I flew back to St. John's, but after twenty minutes of exercise I'd have a headache. I thought it would pass, but it did not pass
My head ached so severely that for a month I could only sleep two or three hours a day. It was a strange sensation. Like a basketball player squeezing your head and not letting go. I became very depressed. You can't do anything, only walk around. No TV even, nor reading, nor sleeping normally. I could not even go to the arena to watch games or my team. Any stress led to severe headaches. I was really in a terrible condition. But, then everything seemed to bounce back. I was getting ready for a new season and Winnipeg held a training camp, where I played in preseason games. They decided to send me to the farm club. But I did not go.

But no health problems...

No. I do not know exactly how to explain, but psychologically I just could not play for the farm team. The idea of finding myself once again in the city, to the team, where I had such a serious concussion, I was depressed. It would be difficult to perform in St. John's.

The problem was more mental?

Yes. I love Winnipeg. I was ready to play for the team if needed, but I understand that St. John's and I cannot coexist. That's why I left.

Was a psychologist referred?

It was. I consulted with him because I had insomnia. I then went home to be with family and quickly recovered. Then I spent all summer in Winnipeg I had no problems. However, when it was decided to send me to the farm club, I could not play.

Now are there any problems?

None. I passed the medical examination, there are no known reasons why I cannot play. You say that it is bad to skip a year. I agree, but at the same time I understand what this break has been for me.

You can find the rest of the interview here.

X
Log In Sign Up

forgot?
Log In Sign Up

Please choose a new SB Nation username and password

As part of the new SB Nation launch, prior users will need to choose a permanent username, along with a new password.

Your username will be used to login to SB Nation going forward.

I already have a Vox Media account!

Verify Vox Media account

Please login to your Vox Media account. This account will be linked to your previously existing Eater account.

Please choose a new SB Nation username and password

As part of the new SB Nation launch, prior MT authors will need to choose a new username and password.

Your username will be used to login to SB Nation going forward.

Forgot password?

We'll email you a reset link.

If you signed up using a 3rd party account like Facebook or Twitter, please login with it instead.

Forgot password?

Try another email?

Almost done,

By becoming a registered user, you are also agreeing to our Terms and confirming that you have read our Privacy Policy.

Join Arctic Ice Hockey

You must be a member of Arctic Ice Hockey to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at Arctic Ice Hockey. You should read them.

Join Arctic Ice Hockey

You must be a member of Arctic Ice Hockey to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at Arctic Ice Hockey. You should read them.

Spinner.vc97ec6e

Authenticating

Great!

Choose an available username to complete sign up.

In order to provide our users with a better overall experience, we ask for more information from Facebook when using it to login so that we can learn more about our audience and provide you with the best possible experience. We do not store specific user data and the sharing of it is not required to login with Facebook.

tracking_pixel_9355_tracker